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About Dean Swift

‘Dean Swift’ is a pen name: the author has been a soldier; he has worked in sales, TV, the making of films, as a teacher of English and history and a journalist. He is married with three grown-up children. They live in Spain.

The history of Golf in Spain

The Spanish Federation of Golf was founded in a private home on October 9, 1932. But Golf itself had been present in Spain for several decades already. In fact, the first golf club in Spain was founded in the island of Gran Canaria in 1891 ! Since then, many golf clubs opened and especially in Andalusia where today there are 92 golf courses, more than any other region in Spain. The country has 424 golf courses, one fifth of them are in Andalusia, which is remarkable.

So the British brought the sport to Spain on the XIX century and created the first Golf Club in Gran Canaria in 1891 in ‘Lomo del Polvo’ but they also had intentions to create another one in the Spanish peninsula. In 1904 the second Golf Club in Spain was created in Madrid, it was called the Madrid Polo Golf Club but it changed its location from Cuarenta Fanegas to Puerta de Hierro. The name also changed to Real Club Puerta de Hierro and it was here where very soon they started organizing the first official Golf tournaments in Spain.

Perhaps the third club in Spain was the Club de Golf de San Sebastián in the Basque Country. Then on 1916 the Real Club de Zarauz was created to complete the Golf offer in Spain before the 1920’s alongside with the Real Club de Golf de El Prat in Catalonia.

The first Golf Club in Andalusia was created in 1925 in the hands of the ‘Club de Campo de Málaga’ and since then Andalusia has created more golf clubs than any other autonomous community in Spain. In Andalusia there is a special place when it comes to Golf and luxury, Sotogrande. Golf in Sotogrande is the most important thing. There is a magnificent Golf Club called La Reserva Club Sotogrande, perhaps the best golf course in Andalusia and maybe in Spain, a club that is linked to the story of Joseph McMicking.

Joseph McMicking was on General MacArthur’s staff during World War II and a Colonel in the United States Army. After the war he became a millionaire after succeding with his companies in California. As a visionary, Joseph sent a close friend to explore the world in search for the most perfect spot for a golf course, he wanted a place with plenty of sun, unspoilt beaches and easy airport access. He found that place in Sotogrande, Andalusia, Spain.

On current days, Spain has 269,600 golf licenses, 1,600 of which are professionals. Andalusia is the region with the most amount of golf clubs with 92 followed by Catalonia and Castilly y León with 40, Comunidad Valenciana with 36, Madrid with 33 and the Canary Islands with 23 ! Spain has produced many professional golfers that have ended up being succesful world wide: Sergio García, Jon Rahm, Larrazabal, Miguel Ángel Jiménez, Jose María Olazabal, Severianos Ballesteros or Álvaro Velasco are only some of the names that Spain has offered to the world competitions.

By | 2019-10-07T16:18:49+00:00 October 7th, 2019|History|0 Comments

Writing an Excellent Essay for History Homework

Title: Writing an Excellent Essay for History Homework

Ever wanted to know how to write a good essay for your history homework? A lot of students do not realise there is a structure. We are going to tell you all about it.

History Homework Help for Students

Are you a history student? Then you will already know how much homework you get every semester. Of course, as a social subject, there are always essays and papers to write for history. But sometimes you could do with a little help when it comes to making it good and ensuring you get a fantastic grade.

So, how do you write an essay for history home? Well, let’s find out.

Think About the Question

First of all, you need to spend some time thinking about the history question and what it is asking you to do. Pick out the keywords from the question. This is going to be your starting point. For example, there should be a clear topic and an instruction, such as ‘argue’ or ‘explain’. It is often the case that you have to pick a side or agree or disagree with the question. Think about what side you want to be on and stick to it when you do your research. It can also be beneficial to create a thesis statement. This is going to announce to your readers what you plan to do during the essay.

Focus on Quality Research

A history essay requires quality sources in order to back up your arguments. In particular, you will have the choice of using primary or secondary sources for your research. Most of the time, this will revolve around secondary materials, such as informational from historians commenting on the topic. But there will be some occasions when primary sources are beneficial. This is information that was created at the time of the events, such as a photograph or film. Always stay away from unreliable sources when you are writing your history homework, especially from the internet.

Take Notes and Make an Outline

Before starting your homework assignment, write down notes from your research. This is going to help you formulate an essay outline. This is going to be what you follow when you are writing your final essay. A lot of students rush into writing their paper without thinking about the sections they want to have. This is often how to get an essay that is mixed up and all over the place. So, take your time and create notes for your introduction, main body, and conclusion. If you do struggle to write your homework, you can always buy an essay online in Canada.

Construct Your Argument

The point of history homework is not only to answer the question but to also demonstrate your knowledge and research on the subject. This can be shown by constructing a good argument, using your facts to back up the points you want to make. You should make sure to split your arguments into different paragraphs so that they are easy to read, having a concluding sentence at the end of each. Be sure not to stray away from your thesis statement.

Do Not Forget the Conclusion

A lot of students are so glad to finish the history homework that they forget to write the conclusion. But this is one of the most important parts. This should summarise your main points and repeat your thesis statement. Always make sure you answer the question and state your opinion.

By | 2019-03-11T09:51:18+00:00 March 11th, 2019|History|0 Comments

The History of Business Cards

When Johannes Gutenberg introduced printing to Europe thanks to the invention of the printing press (15th century), nobody could imagine that this new machine would bring so many useful supplies and equipment, such as what we now call business cards. These presentation cards had even more meaning on the 17th century when they were created and so widely used. I bet not even Johannes Gutenberg, a German blacksmith, goldsmith and inventor could imagine that nowadays we could all buy thousands or millions of business cards from home thanks to a new service we now call: Online Printing.

As we said, on the 17th century business cards were widely used, of course not as much as today, but the vast majority of aristocrats in Europe had their own. They were more or less the size of a poker card of the 21st century, and sometimes the cards were engraved with gold and typefaces.

The 17th century visiting cards would be presented by aristocrat footmen to the servants at the home of a host to announce the arrival of a distinguished guest. And as we said, there were decorated with ornaments and sometimes elegant coat of arms.

By the 19th century, many more people started using them and in some houses it was a ‘must have’ thing, as a part of the century´s protocol. Many high class houses had silver card trays on the hall table along with a pencil and a piece of paper. Whenever somebody came they had to leave their cards there and therefore, in the future, it served as a catalog of those who had visited the house before.

According to Convey, during the Industrial era … ” with the rise of the middle class, a decrease in social formality, and more efficient modern printing techniques, visiting cards and trade cards eventually merged into the precursor to our modern business card. The “business card” became a must have item across both Europe and the United States. This shift, however, was not always smooth. Many in the upper class resisted this merger, creating awkward cultural and social divides. “

But what happened next, in the 20th century? Well as you might imagine, business cards became absolutely essential both for important people and all kind of companies. Every customer would ask for your business card and it would be very weird if your company or brand wouldn’t have one by the 1950’s. It became the established norm even for small businesses and corporate executives.

By the 1980’s a whole culture arose around business cards, nobody could leave home without carrying their own personal or brand business cards, there is even a scene in the American Psycho movie that represents the contagious lunacy that every business man suffered towards business cards.

But the point here is that it is now easier than ever to create the most trendy, fashionable and amazing business cards without having to resort to expensive printing professionals. You just have to make your own design with programs like Photoshop or look for an online printing company like HelloPrint to get the most amazing designs ever, and receive as many copies as you want directly at your home or office.

By | 2019-01-20T13:26:46+00:00 January 20th, 2019|History|0 Comments

Spine problems?

Human beings have suffered spine problems throughout the ages. Fossilized evidence of bone straightening exists and the ancient Greeks perfected this art. Therefore, spine surgery is not new, whether used to correct back deformities in children or because some kind of surgical procedure was necessary. This was a far cry from the spine surgery we use today but it shows that we have always understood that bones can be straightened and corrected. (more…)

By | 2018-11-08T12:08:20+00:00 November 8th, 2018|History|0 Comments

Cosmetic Surgery and its Place in Modern Society

People have been concerned about their appearance from the beginning of recorded history. It might sound surprising, but cosmetic surgery has been around for centuries. The tools and methods may differ, but physicians have always searched for ways to make changes to the body of individuals who want a different look. Most of the procedures we see today have been in existence for many years. Their purpose is the same as it used to be, what has changed throughout the years are the tools and the methods used. For example, tattoos and piercings have been popular for centuries; injections and stitching were used to give the body a beautiful and smoother look, and were the beginning of cosmetic surgery. On the other hand, non-invasive surgery came into existence as a medical treatment which made it unnecessary to cut open the body during surgery, for example, non-invasive back surgery is a surgical procedure recommended for patients who suffer chronic neck or back pain. A degenerated painful disc is replaced with a new artificial one. The aim of this procedure is for the patient to regain a normal lifestyle.  In Artificial Disc Replacement (ADR), no bones are cut.

Different types of cosmetic surgery

Cosmetic surgery and plastic surgery, are different, however, they are closely related. They both deal with improving a patient’s appearance but their underlying principles are different.

Cosmetic surgery is focused solely on enhancing a person’s physical appearance. This can be performed on all areas of the body including the neck and head. Within the scope of cosmetic surgery are body contouring: liposuction, tummy tuck; facial rejuvenation: brow, neck, eyelids, and facelifts; breast enhancement: lifting, reduction; facial contouring: cheek, or chin enhancement, rhinoplasty; skin rejuvenation: Botox, filler treatments, and laser resurfacing.

Plastic surgery deals with repairing birth defects, reconstruction of normal functions and appearance. Some of these defects are caused by disease, trauma, burns, and birth abnormalities. Basically, the aim of plastic surgery is to correct dysfunctional areas of the human body; therefore, it is reconstructive. Plastic surgeons can perform cosmetic surgery, but they tend to specialize in reconstructive plastic surgery. In 1999, the American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons adopted the name American Society of Plastic Surgeons to emphasize the fact that plastic and reconstructive surgery is the same. Some examples of the procedures these surgeons perform are: hand surgery, burn repair surgery, breast reconstruction, lower limb reconstruction, breast reconstruction, congenital defect repair: limb defect repair and cleft palate.

The first cosmetic surgery

As time passed, doctors incorporated cosmetic surgery as a part of plastic surgery. Therefore, cosmetic surgery was born out of reconstructive surgery. This all began in central Asia. Asian physicians used most of the methods used in rhinoplasty today to beautify the shape of the noses of royal family members. Sushruta, an ancient Indian healer, was supposedly one of the first cosmetic surgeons in the world. He was the first person to perform skin grafting around the 6th century BC. He used a piece of skin from another body part to graft on the face to enhance and correct a person’s appearance.

By | 2018-06-26T16:21:11+00:00 June 12th, 2018|History|0 Comments

Henry M. Stanley, explorer and journalist

Henry M. Stanley, explorer and journalist

Stanley with a bearer carring his favourite shooting stick / literaturadeviajes.com

Stanley with a bearer carring his favourite shooting stick / literaturadeviajes.com

One is not too sure that modern schoolchildren are taught about persons like Henry Stanley, or for that matter Dr. Livingstone, with whom Stanley is inextricably connected. It is supposed that vast changes in syllabus are responsible for this, just as in the Classics, neither Latin or Greek are these days awarded much importance. At my school we were unfailingly taught that Henry Stanley was American; he was a naturalized American citizen for a period, but he was born British – Welsh in fact – son of a farmer from that region. He was also illegitimate, and was first called John Rowlands.

Stanley lived a life so adventurous it seemed to be fiction stemming from the Boys Own Paper. Born in 1841 he existed, somehow, in a poorhouse from 1847 to 1856, got away and managed to get himself on a ship sailing to the United States. Here he was luckily befriended by a merchant in cereals who adopted him. Young Henry also took the merchant’s name – Stanley, and after adoption automatically became an American citizen. (more…)

By | 2019-10-15T08:34:10+00:00 September 23rd, 2015|African History, British History, US History, World History|0 Comments

Further thoughts on the SS

/ germaniainternational.com

/ germaniainternational.com

The Schützstaffel was a more or less elite special force created by the National Socialist Party in 1925 for the ‘special protection’ of Adolf Hitler. The name means ‘defence group’, and the significance of its actions is that the force was hated even more within Germany than among her enemies. At first, the SS was a small part of the SA, or Sturm Abteilung, a much bigger Nazi paramilitary organisation, formed to break up dissident political meetings and distribute Nazi propaganda. The SA had played a very big part in the ascent of Hitler to power; its leader was an old-time friend of Hitler’s called Ernst Rohm, but when the SA became, according to the Fuhrer and his associates, too big for its boots, it was dealt with by simply murdering its leaders, including Hitler’s old friend. Most of the summary executions were carried out by the SS. (more…)

By | 2015-09-22T16:51:01+00:00 September 22nd, 2015|German History|0 Comments

Another message from Jeremy Taylor

The author / apaisada.com

The author / apaisada.com

You can read a book (at the risk of your eyesight) off your computer screen, or you can have it read to you by some famous actor; you can beg, borrow or steal a book from a friend – in my case the last verb is the most appropriate – or you may, just possibly prefer to buy the book to keep among all the others in your bookshelf. This kind of printed book is what you take to bed with you, where you read it chapter after chapter with your head nicely rested on your pillows and that reading light you found at Ikea providing the light. Or you can seat yourself in a favourite armchair after choosing a real book from a vast library or a modest collection.

General History is available to just about everywhere on this planet by going to Amazon Books, clicking on Books, and then typing ‘Jeremy Taylor-General-History’ or ‘Dean Swift-General-History’. Click on this and all three volumes (there will soon be a fourth) will appear on your screen. Then choose how you will buy it (at remarkably low cost), and very soon you will have 99% of the articles or posts published on-line, in printed book mode, to keep for ever.

Very best wishes, yours ever, Jeremy Taylor.

By | 2016-06-07T21:34:20+00:00 September 16th, 2015|Today, World History|3 Comments

A bracing brace of Bentincks

3rd Duke of Portland / alaintruong.com

3rd Duke of Portland / alaintruong.com

Hans Willem, Baron Bentinck was born in the middle of the seventeenth century. An aristocrat by birth, he served as a page to the Stadholder (q.v.) William. Surviving his master’s customary bad humour, he became a confidant, friend and agent to the future King William III of England. We have already described how a Dutchman became king of England in another volume of General History, so suffice it to say that William was married to Mary, who descended from Mary Queen of Scots. Thanks to the treachery of Marlborough and others, the rightful monarch of England, James II, was requested to leave, which he did, and William and Mary became joint rulers of England. The good Baron Bentinck came with them.

In fact it was thanks to Bentinck that the marriage between the Stadholder and Princess Mary ( a daughter of James VII and II of Scotland and England ) came about, as he negotiated the terms. Not only that, but the plans for a minor invasion of England by William of Holland in 1688 were supervised by Bentinck. Minor became major, James II ran off to Catholic France, and surly William the Stadholder mounted the English throne accompanied by his wife, who was not blessed with good looks. Once William was installed he rewarded his faithful confidant by making him the Ist Duke of Portland (1689). The ‘Glorious Revolution’ had been achieved with little bloodshed, and the name Bentinck began to ring through British political history. Hans Willem died in 1709. (more…)

The revolt of Portugal

Sunrise over an older part of Lisbon / the guardian.com

Sunrise over an older part of Lisbon / the guardian.com

The first king of this tiny country, washed by the Atlantic, and blessed with fine seamen, navigators and harbours, was Alfonso I, in 1139, but the Portuguese Empire as such began in the fifteenth century. Portuguese ships were making voyages of discovery right round the world. Perhaps her immediate neighbour, Spain, felt that Portugal should belong to her, and by 1580 she did. This situation, most unpopular with the Portuguese, lasted from the above mentioned date until 1668. The French invaded in 1807, and the monarchy was overthrown. Most of the Empire vanished with the loss of Brazil, Goa and Macao.

That union of crowns in 1640 brought nothing but unrest in Portugal, partly because the people quickly noted that Spain was not ready (or able) to defend and protect the vast Portuguese possessions overseas. When troubles started up (again) in Cataluña, powerful Portuguese were encouraged to gather round the standard of the Duke of Braganza. They proclaimed him King Joao IV during an uprising in the capital, Lisbon in December, 1640, which ended with the murder of the Spanish Viceroy Vasconcellos. This was a serious mistake, for Vasconcellos was a personal friend and confidant of the all-powerful Conde-Duque de Olivares, the Spanish minister who managed Spain for the King. No-one, perhaps not even the King, had more power than Olivares at that stage. (more…)

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